From the Field: A Report from Chief Kiboko

We love sharing reports from our program managers, participants, and stakeholders in Tanzania. What follows is from Chief Kiboko (pictured below), a Maasai chief, longtime partner, and advocate for social good. We have worked closely with Chief Koboko over the years as we have established and implemented the Community-Hospital Alliance Program. Below is an exciting glimpse of his most recent report from the field:

Continue reading

How do we empower women?

We’re currently in the midst of a Mother’s Day campaign in which we’re working hard to raise $3,000 for our women’s empowerment programming through the sale of some pretty beautiful jewelry made in Tanzania. Because of our generous business sponsor, Onion Grove Mercantile, we’re offering supporters the chance to donate $30, receive a pair of earrings, and be assured that their money will go toward the women of rural Tanzania. Continue reading

Behind the Scenes with ETI

Empower Tanzania has long been employing technology to deliver vital health information to those living in rural Tanzania. This month, staff and volunteers are hard at work on five new videos to be released next month in Same District and Kagera Region. The reach of these videos is wide — each will serve 630,000 people by using 141 trained Community Health Educators who will present each video 12 times per month! Here are a few behind-the-scenes highlights of our most recent video shoot:

THE WRITER: ETI Program Director Dr. Jeff Carithers wrote the scripts for five new videos being created in a new partnership with World Vision Tanzania to provide public health education focusing on pregnant women and children under two-years-old in northern Tanzania. Scripts are translated into Swahili and delivered by our actors.

THE VIDEOGRAPHER: Mark Burnham, videographer for Unity Point Health, shot the videos. We are grateful to Unity Point and Iowa Methodist Medical Center for allowing Empower Tanzania to use Mark and his studio for filming!

Mark Burnham films as the actors run through the scene prompted with a script shown on an iPad, which serves as telepromptor.

Continue reading

Health Programs Update: Tackling a Taboo

Empower Tanzania works to build safe environments for young women to flourish. This includes allowing them the access to resources they need to be successful. Due to a generous donation from the Des Moines-based group named Half the Sky, we have been able to expand our programs in meaningful, exciting, and synergetic ways!

tzday5-66

In Tanzania, it is taboo to discuss menstruation, urinary tract health, and menstrual hygiene. When a girl begins puberty, she often don’t understand what is happening to her body and is unsure of how to handle it properly. Disposable menstrual pads are expensive and, because of the expense, household rags are commonly used instead. These rags are ineffective and often lead to leakage and embarrassment. Frequent school absences and high dropout rates among girls often follow. In hopes of remedying this problem, Empower Tanzania has partnered with Days for Girls, an organization working in 100 countries that provides training on the production of reusable menstrual pads. This is an effective and inexpensive alternative to the more commonly used rags, leaves, moss, or disposable pads. Continue reading

YouTube as a Training Tool and Healthcare Equalizer

YouTube may be better known for its host of viral cat videos, but Empower Tanzania uses it for more. In fact, YouTube houses an extensive collection of videos that we use to empower our community health workers in rural Tanzania.

With a team of volunteers and experts, we’ve translated dozens of health videos into Swahili and shared them with the 30 Maasai women providing community health worker services in Tanzania. These women provide public health education and basic healthcare to their fellow villagers in 21 rural Maasai villages and are educated, in part, through videos uploaded to their iPads. The Maasai community health workers have learned a great deal and the videos have been of great value to the Community Hospital Alliance Program (CHAP).

Continue reading

Part V: Buy a Band-Aid, Change a Life

This blog post is the final part of a series that takes a closer look at our Community-Hospital Alliance Program (CHAP). In case you missed Part I, Part II, Part III, or Part IV, click on the links to learn about the program’s process and impact. We are currently raising funds for the medical supplies our CHWs and clinics need to operate. Please consider a donation to help sustain this important program.

Continue reading

Maasai Men in Training: A Song of Appreciation

After a year spent serving the people of their villages, our 30 female Community Health Workers (CHWs) felt that training men from their communities would help the Community-Hospital Alliance Program (CHAP) gain momentum and respect. What follows is a report from CHAP program director Jeff Carithers, MD, who led a delegation that spent two weeks this summer providing additional training for our 30 Community Health Workers and, at their request, 30 men from their villages. This post is part of an in-depth look at CHAP. To learn more about the program, read here, here, and here.

Enthusiastic Maasai men during this summer’s CHAP training. The final segment of the Empower Tanzania refresher course included men.

Continue reading

Community-Hospital Alliance Program (CHAP): Christmas in July

This blog post  is part of a series that will take a closer look at our Community-Hospital Alliance Program (CHAP). In case you missed Part I or Part II, click on the links to learn ten key points about this life-changing program. The following post is written by Phil Latessa, executive director of Empower Tanzania.

CHW-Annma-Latasarwake-from-Jitengeni-watches-a-Medical-Aid-Films-video-on-an-iPad

Community Health Worker (CHW) Annma Latasarwake from the village of Jitergeni watches a Medical Aid Films video on an iPad during this summer’s CHAP training.

Continue reading

Ten Things to Know About CHAP (Part I)

Have you ever wondered how health programs in sub-Saharan Africa actually work? This blog post is part of a series that will take a closer look at our Community-Hospital Alliance Program (CHAP). In just over one year, CHAP has reached over 10,000 people in rural Tanzania and continues to be an integral response to the lack of access to healthcare in this impoverished nation.

Continue reading