Njiro Water Project

Children and women of Njiro, along with Empower Tanzania’s accountant Flora, stand along a broken well.

Goal: Provide clean water to the 1,750 people of the village of Njiro, Tanzania

Estimated Cost of Project: $50K

The Problem: A borehole was funded and drilled by an Assemblies of God church 7 years ago and worked for less than a year before it broke. Currently, water is scarce in the village of Njiro and the following hardships are a result…

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Water Party 2018 Success!

On November 11th, 500 people  gathered in downtown Davenport for the 9th annual Water Party, an event that for the third year in a row has benefited Empower Tanzania water projects. It was an incredible night of music, wine, beer, an whiskey tasting, small bites by a favorite local chef, music, and friends. Partygoers bought raffle tickets, tried their hand on the wine pull, shopped for Tanzanian jewelry, and bid on silent auction items and art. Through their incredible generosity, Water Party 2018 raised over $58,000 for clean water in Tanzania!!! Our efforts will focus on the village of Njiro. We are so thankful to all who made the party happen, attended the event, and donated so generously!

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Insight on Business: An Interview with Phil Latessa

Executive Director Phil Latessa was featured on Insight on Business. Listen HERE.

“If you have never heard of Tanzania it’s not much of a surprise to us. Tasmania yes. Tanzania, not so much. That is about to change. Meet Phil Latessa the Executive Director of a non-profit called Empower Tanzania. Here you will learn more about this very poor nation in east Africa, what this organization does with and for the people, how Phil works with village leaders, tribal leaders and government officials to assist with medical care, education and economic development. Why Tanzania? We asked and got an answer and think you should know more.”

Empowerment is…

The founders Empower Tanzania chose the two words of its name deliberately and after long discussion. It was important to focus our efforts—and the funds donated to us—on people, not buildings or equipment. Our target was the marginalized people in Tanzania—the poor, the uneducated, the rural, and across all these categories, the women.

As in many developing countries, women are virtually powerless. The traditional culture relegates them to homemaking and subsistence farming. Education is secondary to their roles of fetching water and firewood, bearing and raising children, and tilling the kitchen garden.

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Women’s Empowerment Event is a Huge Success!

On a cool summer in August, over one hundred Empower Tanzania supporters  gathered at Vivian’s Diner & Drinks in Des Moines to celebrate the work we’ve done and to help launch us into an even better, more ambitious tomorrow. Board members, staff members, volunteers, founders, and friends all gathered to share stories, bid on silent auction items, drink sangria, and eat a fabulous dinner curated by Vivian’s staff. Not only were we given the privilege of the sharing  stories of the people we serve in Tanzania, but together we raised over $10,000 for our women’s empowerment projects in rural Tanzania!! We are so grateful to all who attended and all who donated. So often we spend our time looking ahead to what we’ve yet to do, but the Women’s Empowerment Event allowed us to pause and celebrate the work our teams in the states and in Tanzania has done so faithfully over the years. To view an alum of photos from the event, click HERE.

Our incredible volunteers made this night happen:

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10 Steps to Water at Pangaro

Clean water solutions are incredibly complex and require intense planning, organization, management, and fundraising. Here’s a brief primer on how we delivered on our promise of clean water in the village of Pangaro:

1. Acknowledge request from the community for a clean water source. After learning about the need, Empower Tanzania made a commitment to the people of Pangaro and asked that the community form a water committee.

Click on the photo to watch a video explaining the need.

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Meet Four of the Most Empowered Women in Tanzania

If you’ve followed Empower Tanzania for long, you know that we provide  tremendous opportunities to advance the rights of women across the globe. Why? Because we believe it’s important to empower women and to lift one another up. Projects that benefit women are crucial and we’re grateful to our staff, program managers, and donors who are exceedingly generous with their time and resources. We’ve spent nearly a decade educating and empowering women across the Same District of rural Tanzania. Allow us to introduce you to four of the most empowered!

Nietiwe

Nietiwe is a successful farmer in our Integrated Farming Program. Her training, skills, and hard work pays for her four children’s school fees, healthy food for her family, and even a motorcycle to use to gather fresh grass for her livestock!

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How do we empower women?

We’re currently in the midst of a Mother’s Day campaign in which we’re working hard to raise $3,000 for our women’s empowerment programming through the sale of some pretty beautiful jewelry made in Tanzania. Because of our generous business sponsor, Onion Grove Mercantile, we’re offering supporters the chance to donate $30, receive a pair of earrings, and be assured that their money will go toward the women of rural Tanzania. Continue reading

Water is Life (World Water Day 2017)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The  men and women we work with in Tanzania often tell us that “WATER IS LIFE.” They say this with a seriousness that is sometimes difficult for Westerners to comprehend due to our oft-taken-for-granted infrastructure. “MAJI NI UHAI,” one of our program managers, farmers, educators, or students might exclaim in Swahili. WATER IS LIFE. Too many Tanzanian women and children walk miles upon miles—spending a good portion of their day that could be devoted to work or school—collecting water that may or may not be clean. We take this challenge seriously and work hard to find sustainable solutions to this very basic human need at every level of our programming. Here’s a glimpse of what it all entails:

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